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Guide to an Unknown University

Introduction by Theodore Zeldin

Discover the secrets behind the facade of an ivory tower. The new book by The Oxford Muse, introduced by acclaimed historian and broadcaster Theodore Zeldin, is an intimate portrait of the University of Oxford. Hear the voices of porters and students alongside those of professors and college masters.

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The Thoughts, Feelings and Imaginations of a University

by students, researchers, professors, staff and alumni

  • How a specialist in brain diseases cultivates his own mind
  • How an undergraduate lives in doubt, in rebellion and in an imagined world
  • Why a college porter writes poetry
  • How polio has and has not coloured a professor’s life
  • What motivates a government advisor, head of an Oxford college
  • Why a former management consultant has returned to study history
  • Why I painted my face, tooth and glasses black
  • Why diary-writing and navel-gazing do not tell you who you are

 

Picture of front cover of 'Guide to an Unknown University'

What kind of human beings inhabit and inspire the University of Oxford? In what state do they emerge from it? What is most important to them and what is missing from their lives? This book reveals what they seldom make public, presenting them not as statistics or stereotypes, but as unique individuals. Each speaks in their own words, uncensored.

Introduced by Theodore Zeldin, author of An Intimate History of Humanity, this collection of portraits shows why and how universities need to reinvent themselves.

Contents

Voices

GUIDE TO AN UNKNOWN UNIVERSITY

Published by The Oxford Muse (2006, 438 pages, ISBN 09551405)

BUY NOW FROM BLACKWELL'S BOOKSHOP ONLINE (£14.99 plus p&p)

 

For bulk orders please contact The Oxford Muse

Comments from contributors

‘Apart from my boyfriend, no one really knows my real thoughts and feelings that well. Hopefully this self-portrait will give them an insight.’

‘Writing a self-portrait is such an addictive thing. The more I write the more it challenges my thoughts.’

‘I don’t normally talk about myself this much. It’s a liberating experience.’

The Oxford Muse